Tips on Helping Your Kids Develop Confidence

 Self-confidence is a belief in your ability to master your behavior, body and the challenges you face in your life. And it is a key ingredient not only for school success, but for all aspects of your child's healthy development. Kids who are confident are eager learn new things and face new challenges. In large part, a kid's sense of confidence is shaped and nurtured by the parents, relatives, caregivers and teachers.

 

Here are some great tips to develop self-confidence in your child:

Love your child

This may sound obvious and hilarious, but your child truly needs your love. Your little one needs to feel loved and accepted, beginning with the family and extending to other groups such as sports teams, schoolmates and friends. If you ignore or yell or make some other mistakes that parents can do, give your kid a warm hug and tell her you are very sorry and you love her a lot. Unconditional love builds a strong foundation for confidence.

Give praise where praise is due

Young children measure their worth and achievements by what you think, so it is of a great importance to give them praise and positive feedback. Make sure you are realistic in your praise. If a kid doesn't show a talent at a particular skill or fails at something, praise the effort, but don't unrealistically praise the results. Don't forget to reassure your child that it is OK not to be able to do everything perfectly.,

Encourage sports or other physical activities

Sport and any other physical activity can help both girls and boys build confidence. They learn that if they exercise, they can improve and achieve goals. They also learn teamwork, expand their circle of friends, handle defeat, accept or strengthen their weaknesses and recognize their strengths. If your child doesn't pursue an organized sport, like football, ballet, or some other organized sport, then try to find a physical activity like hiking, baking, martial arts or dance.

Help your child learn to be a problem solver

Help your kid work through problems, but make sure you don't always solve everything for them. For instance, you can start with a tower - move the blocks on the bottom and let your kid figure out how to make it balance. Give her a chance to feel proud and successful of the moves she made.

The main goal is to support and guide your child in her problem-solving efforts, but not to get things done for her. Sometimes, the moments of frustrations can actually be golden opportunities for your child to develop confidence.

Coach relationship skills

The most important relationship is the parent-child relationship and as their social circle expands, as a parent you need to help your child see how her actions affect others and help her learn to maintain an inner core of confidence when someone else's actions affect her. You don't have to fix every situation, but teach your little one the self-assertiveness, kindness, compassion and, yes, confidence to handle the ups and downs of relationships.

Be a role model yourself

Your kids are always keenly watching you for clues about what to do or how to feel about social interactions or different tasks. When it comes to learning how to manage emotions like frustration, anger, or hurt, you are their "go-to" person. If you can be a confident and persistent person, then your kid will learn this too.

 

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